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No.209

  April 20, 2009
The Ship Recycling Convention and Japan's Role
Koichi Kato
Director, International Affairs Office, Shipbuilding and Ship Machinery Division, Maritime Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Selected Papers No.12 pdf
Learn about Ships and the Sea at the Museum of Maritime Science
Nobuyuki Kobori
Director of Educational Activities, Museum of Maritime Science
The First Japanese to Circle the Globe:Castaways of the Wakamiya-Maru
Mikio Oshima
Secretary-General, Ishinomaki Wakamiya-Maru Castaway Society
Selected Papers No.12 pdf

The Ship Recycling Convention and Japan's Role

Koichi Kato
Director, International Affairs Office, Shipbuilding and Ship Machinery Division, Maritime Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism

When they come to the end of their operational life, superannuated ships are usually sent to be dismantled in developing countries, where labor costs are lower. In some countries, ship breaking is frequently accompanied by fatalities, serious injuries or environmental pollution, creating a problem of worldwide concern. To address this problem, a Ship Recycling Convention is due to be adopted in May this year. As a world leader in ocean navigation and shipbuilding, Japan is expected to show leadership in this respect.

Learn about Ships and the Sea at the Museum of Maritime Science

Nobuyuki Kobori
Director of Educational Activities, Museum of Maritime Science

In the museum world, the praises of “dialogue” and “cooperation” are often sung. 
The hands-on learning and display activities carried out by the Museum of Maritime Science are designed to foster interest in ships and the sea, but to maintain and build on this interest we believe “dialogue” and “cooperation” with the home and schools is needed and so look upon this as a challenge we want to address.

The First Japanese to Circle the Globe:Castaways of the Wakamiya-Maru

Mikio Oshima
Secretary-General, Ishinomaki Wakamiya-Maru Castaway Society

This is the story of four shipwrecked sailors from the Wakamiya-Maru who unwittingly circled the globe during Japan's era of national isolation. Behind their extraordinary tale lay an impasse between Russia, which sought trade with Japan, and the shogun, who wished only to maintain Japan's isolation. This paper will retrace the footsteps of the Wakamiya-Maru castaways and introduce the activities of the Ishinomaki Wakamiya-Maru Castaway Society, established in 2001 to commemorate their journey.

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